Welcome Ralph Nader

Ralph Nader has joined the race.   Before we Democrats get our knickers in a bunch – Nader won’t have an effect on the race…at least he shouldn’t.     Nader made this comment on Meet the Press today:

“If the Democrats can’t landslide the Republicans this year, they ought to just wrap up, close down, emerge in a different form.”

He’s very right.   I guess I respect his belief in changing government by changing the conversation – but I will admit his mere existence in this election scares me.   Unlike 8 years ago, the Democrats have two great candidates who are up to the fight.   Gore lost the 2000 election on his own.

Honestly – I’ve commented before that I think voting for a 3rd party candidate, when the we’re in Iraq, when the Supreme Court is in balance, when the economy is in a tatters, when so many people don’t have health care – is basically throwing your vote away.   Actually it’s more of a vote for status quo than anything.

Anyway – I hope he can change the discussion without affecting the race.

An already interesting campaign, has gotten even more interesting.

  • http://fortyninepercenter.blogspot.com/ Joey

    I have to disagree. If Nader thinks that this election is the Dems’ to lose, than why is he participating? It seems really counter-productive. What are his real intentions? Doesn’t he realize that he throws a monkey-wrench into the election by his involvement?

    That’s like a guy saying, “If your girlfriend is really in love with you, she won’t go out with me when I ask her.”

    Just what is Nader trying to prove?

    His presence just confuses the issue.
    At his best, Nader is comic relief. And, in case no one is looking, this shit isn’t funny, anymore.

  • grace

    I really love what Ralph Nader has to say about the state of our government. He says that the People are left out of the conversation; corporations make all the decisions. And he’s right.

    If you watch the documentary about him, An Unreasonable Man, you’ll learn a lot about Nader, American history and the current state of politics. Nader is a man of deep, honest conviction. He runs for president against his own desires, almost. That’s how he sees it. Because in the 1960s and 1970s he had access to politicians, they would actually listen to him. Then in the eighties it was a stone wall, and has only gotten worse and worse, until now, when most politicians won’t even acknowledge his existence. And it’s easy to understand why. Because big corporations hate him, and if a politician was seen listening to Nader, all their big campaign funds would dry up. (If you don’t know why corporations hate Nader, go to the library and read something–fast.)

    So, he runs for president to be heard. He’s left with no other options.

    I would never discourage him from fighting the fights he has fought for almost 50 years. He’s one of the only public figures who tries to make life for American citizens better. That really is his only goal. I can’t vote for him for many reasons, but I admire him and encourage third parties to wedge their way into the political arena. Anyone that begrudges him a presidential campaign doesn’t make sense to me.

  • Spencer

    I think what Nader has to say is important – but I have to wonder if he could have more impact by working with the parties and not banging his head against the wall to have 10% of what he says be heard.

    It reminds me of a story about environmentalist Adam Werbach who after years of protesting big companies like Walmart, joined Walmart as their green advocate. He said he can be more effective from the inside than he can from the outside. He’s been called a traitor by other advocates, and maybe he went for the money.

    At the end of the day I don’t think people will listen to Nader. 8 years ago we were coming off of the Clinton years – and neither candidate from the major parties excited the public; a third party candidate made sense.

    This year is different.

    After 8 years of George Bush – 9/11, the war in Afghanistan, the Iraq War, Hurricane Katrina, and the current recession (due primarily to the mortgage crisis), I think voters will take more into account than what Nader has to offer. Nader’s strength is consumer protection – and as important as that is, it will be trumped by the economy and national security.

    Come September, no one will be talking about Nader. This election is too important for him.

  • http://swedehartjournal.blogspot.com Jessica

    I kind of like some of Nader’s ideas. The thing is, I agree with you, wasted vote. I wish we weren’t so limited to two parties. Maybe someday that will change.

    At least now we have candidates who aren’t all white males. Progress!

  • http://fortyninepercenter.blogspot.com/ Joey

    I have to disagree. If Nader thinks that this election is the Dems' to lose, than why is he participating? It seems really counter-productive. What are his real intentions? Doesn't he realize that he throws a monkey-wrench into the election by his involvement?

    That's like a guy saying, “If your girlfriend is really in love with you, she won't go out with me when I ask her.”

    Just what is Nader trying to prove?

    His presence just confuses the issue.
    At his best, Nader is comic relief. And, in case no one is looking, this shit isn't funny, anymore.