Thoughts about Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

21w4m4r4wkl_aa_sl160_.jpgI think the beauty of good fiction is often in its ability to transform the fantastic into a relevant and meaningful story and message to anyone willing to consider the possibility. With that said, here’s a quote from the latest Harry Potter. I don’t think it spoils anything; but it’s a great quote that mirrors feelings I’ve had in real life

It’s a curious thing Harry, but perhaps those best suited for power are those who have never sought it. Those who, like you, have leadership thrust upon them, and take up the mantle because they must, and find to their own great surprise that they wear it well.

I couldn’t agree more.

More thoughts (including spoilers) hidden under the cloak of invisibility (or by clicking the more link below)


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  • I really liked the epilogue – I think that it closed the series and eliminated the need to kill off any main characters. There’s no need for any more. Anything else should just be different. You have to wonder whether or not Rowling will write again – she definitely has no need to financially. But the series was so well thought out, especially from Goblet of Fire on, that you have to think she loves doing this and at 40, can’t be done.
  • I have to go back and re-read the Half-Blood Prince. I missed the importance of Draco Malfoy getting the wand from Dumbledore and that plays such a huge part in the book. Plus it’s been 2 years – I started off reading the current book thinking “what the hell is a horcrux”.
  • I can’t wait to see the final battle on film. Seeing Mrs. Weasly take on Bellatrix Lestrange. Seeing the final showdown between Harry and Voldemort. Seeing Professor McGonagall kick some serious ass. What else did I miss?
  • I knew Snape wasn’t evil. My comments of August 4th 2005, after finishing the last book: “I’ll agree with a few before and say that I knew Dumbledore was a goner. That said, I didn’t call Snape doing it. I still believe there’s more to this than meets the eye. The fact that Snape killed Dumbledore against Voldemort’s wishes but didn’t kill Harry is telling. Harry is not the skilled wizard – Snape could have killed him easily and didn’t. That and the fact that Snape being evil is just too easy.” Brilliant mind that Spencer.

I’ll probably have more. I’m going to re-read the books starting with the Goblet of Fire. I started reading these books in the summer of 2002 – so at that time, there were 4 books ready to read. Post that, I had to wait two years between each book, and the recall between each one diminished greatly.

Please share your thoughts.

  • http://www.thewebpen.net/blog Howard

    I thought it was a completely satisfying end to the series. I need to sit down and write out my thought in a few days (after the self-imposed one-month silence is over).

    My only disappointment? At the risk of spoiling (YOU’VE BEEN WARNED)…

    No mention of a Snape portrait in the headmaster’s office. He deserves one for sure. And I am in your camp. One of the Monkeys and I had several long (and serious, believe it or not) conversations about why we both thought Snape was still good. My sentiments reflected yours. If you read the dialog in the scene where Harry finally catches up to Snape in Book 6, Snape is still trying to teach Harry how to defend himself against attack.

    Speaking of Snape, my favorite part of Book 7 was the Snape memory chapter. For me, it explained everything and in a way I completely didn’t expect. Love surprises like that.

  • http://www.svrspy.blogspot.com Scarlet

    I agree with everything you said. I, too, maintained that Snape had to be good. I loved the stuff from the pensieve. Wow! It amazes me how well thought out this series was. When I finished I was like, “that was so cool!”

  • Spencer

    I forgot to write about those that passed away during the book. Of course the big 3 survived – and as tough as that might be to believe, I think anything else would feel like a win for Voldemort. I was worried that Hagrid was a goner, but I think the deaths of Fred, Tonks, and Lupin are significant enough to make the results realistic – but killing off the main characters wouldn’t have sit well with me.

  • Spencer

    Howard – I think my favorite chapter is Dumbledore talking with Harry after Voldemort “kills” Harry. I loved Dumbledore being able to answer and set things straight – and it also demonstrates the journey that Harry had to take during the book.

  • http://stillbaking.ca/blog suze

    I also KNEW Snape couldn’t be evil. He just couldn’t have been (although, I have an unquestioning love of Alan Rickman and the actor and the character have blurred in this case I’m afraid…)

    I too found it to be a satisfying ending, yet I still felt like ‘killing’ Harry and then not killing him was a bit of a cop-out. (although, if you believe Rowling’s statements about if you know her faith, you’d know the ending the whole death then resurrection thing is in keeping with that…)

    And the whole setting Harry up to be godfather to a boy who is orphaned as an infant when his parents are killed by Voldemort was a bit contrived for me…

    But she does weave a well-plotted tale and I really can’t complain more than I already have…

    (and I also love that Mrs. Weasley got to take on Bellatrix. Very nice! I always knew she could kick ass…)

  • http://swedehartjournal.blogspot.com Jess

    I liked that statement when I read it, too!